Multicultural

10/02/2017 - 1:37pm
Play Yoga: Have Fun and Grow Healthy and Happy! by Lorena Pajalunga

Author and yoga practitioner Lorena Pajalunga believes that children can grasp the important symbolic root of yoga practice. When children are asked to become "strong like a lion," or "feel the energy of an eagle," they can immediately become that energy and embody it—while adults, who have more of a commitment to literal analogy, may take longer to embrace these suggestions. Pajalunga has dedicated her new book, Play Yoga: Have Fun and Grow Healthy and Happy, to children around the world who "can internalize what is proposed to them," such as poses that are based on well-known animals.

10/02/2017 - 1:44pm
The Shady Tree by Demi

Once upon a time in China, there was a spoiled boy named Tan Tan who lived in a very big house, shaded by a very big tree.

04/06/2017 - 2:07am
Cover to The Language of Angels: A Story about the Reinvention of Hebrew

What happens if no one speaks a language for nearly 2,000 years? Is it dead? Latin and ancient Greek are sometimes called “dead” languages because they are rarely spoken anymore. We still use both those languages, especially for worship services or studying science and literature, but most people do not talk to each other using either language every day.

It was the same for Hebrew, which has also been called “the language of the angels.” A Jewish scholar and father, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda was one of many Jews living in Palestine (part of the Ottoman Empire) in the 19th century, and he wanted to give the Jewish people who had drawn together from across the world a shared language, a language that reflected their faith.

05/23/2017 - 11:33am
Meeting Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is famous today for her memorable words. She should also be remembered for her indomitable spirit.

02/16/2017 - 12:35am
Cover to Ada's Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood

“For me, the violin means everything . . . life.” —Ada Rios

In Ada Ríos’ hometown of Cateura, Paraguay, trash is a way of life. The landfill is a source of income for the gancheros, or recyclers, who spend the days picking through trash to find cardboard or plastic to sell. As a young girl, Ada wondered if she, too, would grow up to work in the landfill. Most people in her town did. Little did she know that trash would be a large part of her life in a completely unexpected way.

01/31/2017 - 12:47pm
2017 Youth Media Award Winners

The ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children) media awards are announced every January during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting. Read about the winners and honorable mentions below. The Youth Media Awards, announced in January include several awards for teen literature as well. 
 

2017 Newbery Medal Winner

The Newbery Medal is awarded for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature the previous year.
 

The Girl Who Drank the Moon
The Girl Who Drank the Moon
 by Kelly Barnhill 

Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk, and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian. Xan rescues the abandoned children and delivers them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey. One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. The acclaimed author of The Witch's Boy has created another epic coming-of-age fairy tale destined to become a modern classic.

 

01/10/2017 - 8:25am
Elizabeth I, Red Rose of the House of Tudor by Kathryn Lasky

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Elizabeth I, Red Rose of the House of Tudor by Kathryn Lasky
In a series of diary entries, Princess Elizabeth, the eleven-year-old daughter of King Henry VIII, celebrates holidays and birthdays, relives her mother's execution, revels in her studies, and agonizes over her father's health. (catalog summary)


Check out these other Royal Diaries titles:
 



Anacaona, Golden Flower
by Edwidge Danticat
Beginning in 1490, Anacaona keeps a record of her life as a possible successor to the supreme chief of Xaragua, as wife of the chief of Maguana, and as a warrior battling the first white men to arrive in the West Indies, ravenous for gold. (catalog summary)



 

 



Anastasia, the Last Grand Duchess
by Kathryn Lasky
A novel in diary form in which the youngest daughter of Czar Nicholas II describes the privileged life her family led up until the time of World War I and the tragic events that befell them. (catalog summary)

 


 

12/22/2016 - 2:52am
Shmelf the Hanukkah Elf by Greg Wolfe

Shmelf is one of Santa's new elves, and his job is to check the "naughty or nice" list twice before Christmas Eve. He notices that there are quite a few children on the list who have been good but are not receiving gifts under the tree.

11/24/2016 - 2:32am
Cover to Molly’s Pilgrim by Barbara Cohen

It’s the early 20th century, and Molly and her family have moved to the small town of Winter Hill from New York City. In the city, there were many immigrants like themselves, but, in Winter Hill, Molly is constantly teased by her classmates for the way she looks, talks, and dresses.

Everything is new to her, and some days are very hard. When the teacher gives the class an assignment to make a pilgrim doll from a clothespin, Molly’s mother helps her make it, but it doesn’t look like the others. The doll looks like a member of Molly’s family because Molly’s mother knows they are pilgrims, too. As Jews, they faced danger when they were no longer allowed to live peacefully in Russia because of their faith—much like the pilgrims leaving England for the New World.

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